Mar 31

“MailChimp to Cryptocurrency Promoters: Your Fake Money’s No Good Here,” jokes the headline at Gizmodo. The mass emailing service — which sends over a billion emails a day — just updated its Acceptable Use Policy to warn users that MailChimp “does not allow businesses involved in any aspect of the sale, transaction, exchange, storage, marketing, or production of cryptocurrencies, virtual currencies, and any digital assets related to an Initial Coin Offering, to use MailChimp to facilitate or support any of those activities.”
An anonymous reader quotes Gizmodo:
The ban on cryptocurrency promotion isn’t out of the blue so much as a clarification of existing use policies… In a statement to Gizmodo, MailChimp further clarified: “We recognize that blockchain technology is in its infancy and has tremendous potential. Nonetheless, the promotion and exchange of cryptocurrencies is too frequently associated with scams, fraud, phishing, and potentially misleading business practices at this time…” MailChimp previously held policies prohibiting multi-level marketing, “make money online” businesses, and “industries hav[ing] higher-than-average abuse complaints,” and earmarked “online trading, day trading tips, or stock market related content” for “additional scrutiny…” This follows similar, though less restrictive bans by Facebook (and Instagram by extension), Google, Linkedin, Twitter, and Snapchat on ICO ads, and country-wide bans in China and South Korea.

Futurism reports that the first victims are “responding in kind by attempting to read the riot act to a Twitter account whose avatar is a monkey with a hat,” strongly informing that monkey that “Centralized capricious power is exactly why we need blockchains.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

full article

Mar 31

The founder of Rendition Security believes his daughter “is more safe on a Chromebook than a Windows laptop,” and he’s not the only one. CNET’s staff reporter argues that Google’s push for simplicity, speed, and security “ended up playing off each other.” mspohr shared this article:
Heading to my first security conference last year, I expected to see a tricked-out laptop running on a virtual machine with a private network and security USB keys sticking out — perhaps something out of a scene from “Mr. Robot.” That’s not what I got. Everywhere I went I’d see small groups of people carrying Chromebooks, and they’d tell me that when heading into unknown territory it was their travel device… “If you want prehardened security, then Chromebooks are it,” said Kenneth White, director of the Open Crypto Audit Project. “Not because they’re Google, but because Chrome OS was developed for years and it explicitly had web security as a core design principle….” Drewry and Liu focused on four key features for the Chromebook that have been available ever since the first iteration in 2010: sandboxing, verified boots, power washing and quick updates. These provided security features that made it much harder for malware to pass through, while providing a quick fix-it button if it ever did.

That’s not to say Chrome OS is impervious to malware. Cybercriminals have figured out loopholes through Chrome’s extensions, like when 37,000 devices were hit by the fake version of AdBlock Plus. Malicious Android apps have also been able to sneak through the Play Store. But Chrome OS users mostly avoided massive cyberattack campaigns like getting locked up with ransomware or hijacked to become part of a botnet. Major security flaws for Chrome OS, like ones that would give an attacker complete control, are so rare that Google offers rewards up to $200,000 to anyone who can hack the system.
The article argues that “Fewer software choices mean limited options for hackers. Those are some of the benefits that have led security researchers to warm up to the laptops…
“Chrome OS takes an approach to security that’s similar to the one Apple takes with iOS and its closed ecosystem.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

full article

Mar 30

Parallels Remote Application Server (RAS) is a secure solution that provides clinicians access to medical applications and patient data on any… Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 30

MEGAZONE Corporation , an AWS Premier Consulting partner and a cloud-specialized IT company, today announced that it was approved as AWS Financial… Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 30

Monkeys are smart, but humans are smarter; this all has to do with our perception of our environment, our adaptability, and unique ability to learn,… Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 30

Cyber attacks have been going on since the 1980s. They may not have been as grandiose back then compared to today, but it did give rise to the… Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 30

Cloud computing has been around now for some time but questions about security still linger-especially with reports of widespread data breaches…. Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 30

Article Written by Craig Badrick, President and CEO of Turn-key Technologies The healthcare industry as a whole remains woefully behind the cloud… Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 29

Appdome , the mobile industry’s first no-code, cloud platform for mobile app integration, today announces a new service, called BoostEMM by Appdome , Read more at VMblog.com.

Mar 29

IBM has introduced a new development environment called Microclimate which is designed to simplify and speed up app creation and modernization in… Read more at VMblog.com.

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